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Title: Week One: Sentence Patterns
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#5
Quote:Day 5
S + LV + SC

Subject + Linking Verb + Subject Complement

Susan is a gifted athlete.
John’s face turned red.
Joan felt sick.

A subject complement is the adjective, noun, or pronoun that follows a linking verb.
The simplest definition of an adjective is a word that describes or clarifies a noun. Adjectives describe nouns by giving some information about their size, shape, age, color, origin or material.
Most adjectives do NOT end in –ly, but some do. Examplen: Elderly, Friendly, Lovely, Lonely, Silly, Ugly, Costly, Curly, Deadly, and many more. If the word can go in front of a noun and modifies it, it is an adjective. Examples: The tall man. The crazy cat. The good woman.
A linking verb (LV) expresses a state of being; it is any form of the verb to be, become, or seem.
A linking verb links the subject to the complement.
Common verbs that can exist as either action verbs or linking verbs include: Grow, Look, Prove, Remain, Smell, Sound, Taste, Turn, Stay, Get, Appear, Feel
If you can substitute the word "is" or "are" for the verb –and the sentence still makes sense - it is almost always a linking verb.
Do not confuse direct objects with subject complements. Determine the verb, and that will tell you if it is a DO or a SC. Direct objects need transitive (action) verbs; subject complements need linking verbs.
EX: Howard felt the tomato. Here felt is an action word so tomato is a DO. Susan felt well. Felt is a linking verb here so well is a SC. Susan is well. But not “Howard is the tomato.”
A subject complement gives us more information about the subject. The SC either renames or describes the subject. A SC can 'modify' the subject in much the same way an adjective modifies a noun.
In a sentence with a LV and a SC, the subject isn’t doing anything; it is being something. If the subject were doing something, it would need an action verb. Not a verb of being.

Subject Complement examples:

It was I.
Ben is a policeman.
It will be fine.
Emma was a ghost.
She was lovely.
He was lonely.

Review:

A clause is a group of words that contain a subject its finite verb. Every complete sentence is made up of at least one clause.
An independent clause (or main clause) makes sense by itself. It expresses a complete thought.
A dependent clause (or subordinate clause) does not make sense by itself. It does not express a complete thought.
A dependent clause usually begins with a subordinating conjunction(after, although, before, because, until, etc), a relative pronoun ( who, whom, which, whoever, whomever, whichever, and that), or some other word that causes it to become dependent. A dependent clause will make sense only when attached to an independent clause.

Homework:

A Subject Complement is an ______, noun, or pronoun that follows a ______ verb.
A linking verb (LV) expresses a state of ______; it is any form of the verb ______ ______, become, or seem.
A linking verb links the ______ to the ______.
Some verbs can be linking or ______ verbs: appear, grow, look, feel, prove, remain, smell, etc. If you can substitute the word "is" or "are" for a verb –and the sentence still makes sense - it is almost always a linking verb.
Do not confuse direct objects with subject complements. Determine the ______ and that will tell you if it is a DO or a SC.
A DO needs a ______ verb; a SC needs a _______ verb.
A SC gives us more information about the ______. The SC either ______ or describes the ______.
Write three S + LV + SC sentences.

Clauses: Independent or Dependent?

Four eagles soared over the river
After it finished raining
Which many of us enjoy
When radio shows were popular
Because there were so many possibilities
For all it brightens and uplifts, love casts a long shadow.
 
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Messages In This Thread
Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Edward - 01-01-2020, 05:23 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Edward - 01-01-2020, 05:27 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 01-01-2020, 05:37 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 01-01-2020, 05:40 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 01-01-2020, 05:41 PM

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