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Title: Week One: Sentence Patterns
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#1
Quote:Day 1
Pattern 1: S + V
Subject + verb.
Examples: He jumped. I shouted. They fought. Jane slept.
In certain contexts, a single word may communicate a complete thought. Example: Jump. In "Jump" the subject "you" is understood. But usually, a sentence needs at least two elements: a subject, which can be a noun or pronoun, and a predicate, which can be as simple as a verb.
Ex: David slept.
A sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought. A sentence must contain at least a subject (although one may be implied) and a verb.

Sounds/Letters - Words - Phrases - Clauses - Sentences - Paragraphs
Syntax is the arrangement of words and phrases and clauses to create well-formed sentences.
Sounds/Letters form words.
Words form Phrases and Clauses.
Phrases and Clauses form Sentences.
Sentences form Paragraphs.
A  phrase is a unit of words that stand together as part of a clause or sentence. 
A clause is a unit of words containing a subject and predicate. In other words, a clause has a subject doing a verb or being something.
Examples: She laughed at her. He is tall. Because I could not stop for death,
A clause can be either independent or dependent. A dependent clause cannot stand by itself because it needs something else to complete the thought. An independent clause can stand on its own: it is a complete sentence.

Homework: Part One
A group of words is either a phrase or a ______.
A clause has a ______ doing a verb.
A clause can be either ______ or ______. A ______ clause cannot stand by itself because it needs something else to complete the thought. An ______ clause can stand on its own: it is a complete sentence.

In your own words:
What is a clause?
What are the two types of clauses?
What are the differences between the two types of clauses?

Three simple variations on S + V:

  • 1A
Compound Subject + Verb.
A compound subject consists of more than one noun, pronoun, or noun phrase joined by a conjunction. For now, let's just keep it to "noun and noun."
Mark and Craig slept.
Mary and Sally and Bob read.
He and she ate.
  • 1B
S + Compound Verb
A compound verb or predicate consists of two or more verbs or verb phrases. A compound predicate tells two or more things about the same subject without repeating the subject.
Helen runs and jumps.
Jon cried and whined.
Janet ate and drank and danced.

  • 1C
Compound S + Compound V
Combine a compound subject with a compound predicate and viola! Not much more needed to understand these variations because you already understand the elements.
This pattern shows two or more subjects doing two or more activities.
Jon and Helen run and jump.
Ben and Lisa walked and talked.

Homework Part Two:
Write an S + V patterned sentence.
Write a Compound S + V patterned sentence.
Write an S + Compound V patterned sentence.
Write a Compound S + Compound V patterned sentence.
And it's just that easy. Tomorrow, on to direct objects!
My name is Homo Sapiens, Hominid of Hominids, look upon my works, ye mighty, and despair.
 
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Messages In This Thread
Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Edward - 01-01-2020, 05:23 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Edward - 01-01-2020, 05:27 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 01-01-2020, 05:37 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 01-01-2020, 05:40 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 01-01-2020, 05:41 PM

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