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Title: Week Ten: Sentence Patterns
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Week One:

Sentence Pattern:
 
Cumulative Sentences Part One:
A cumulative sentence gets its name from the way it accumulates information, gathering new details as it goes, like a snowball gets bigger and bigger as you roll it through the snow.
Modifiers:
A modifier is a word, phrase, or clause which functions as an adjective or an adverb to describe a word or make its meaning more specific. An adjective describes a noun or pronoun; an adverb modifies verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. There are two classes of modifiers - bound and free.
Bound modifiers
Bound modifiers are not set off by commas but interwoven into a base clause (main clause, aka independent clause) that they modify. A bound modifier must occur in only one position (sometimes you can stretch it to two) for the meaning to remain constant.
They live in a beautiful house.
He writes elegant letters.
He drives a fast car.
He runs quickly.
She walks slowly.
 
Free modifiers
Free: it’s not bound to a word or phrase
Modifier: it describes or limits something
The point of calling them free modifiers is that they are free to be moved around.
Free modifiers are words or phrases or clauses that can be easily moved from one place in a sentence to another, from the beginning to the middle to the end, without changing the meaning of the sentence.
Example:
Crystal stayed up all night reading a book, enjoying every minute of it.
Enjoying every minute of it, Crystal stayed up all night reading a book.
Crystal, enjoying every minute of it, stayed up all night reading a book.

Free modifiers can be identified by these characteristics:
  1. they are not necessary to make the sentence complete (they are nonessential);
    2. they can be located anywhere in a sentence — beginning, middle, or end;
    3. they are most often punctuated with commas;
    4. they are usually identified by the first word in the phrase (like all phrases); and
    5. they are NOT independent clauses.

The two parts of a cumulative sentence are the base clause and the modifying phrases. The base clause contains the sentence’s main subject and verb; it is an independent clause; it can stand on its own. The second part of a cumulative sentence contains one or more modifying phrases; they cannot stand alone, and they can be removed from the sentence without destroying the sentence.

A cumulative sentence is a loose sentence; it begins with the main clause that is followed by phrases/or clauses that modify the main clause. These phrases or clauses add information to the main or independent clause.
Examples of (loose) cumulative sentences:
He sat by the windows, hunched down in a rocking chair, scowling, waiting.
The fire alarm went off, making a loud clanging noise, startling everyone, and causing some people to knock over their chairs.
I spotted a flock of geese flying overhead, honking and making their way to the lake.
I liked everything about the painting, the colors, the composition, the emotions that it stirred within me.
Homework:
What is the difference between a bound modifier and a free modifier?
What is the difference between a phrase and a clause?
What are the two parts a cumulative sentence?
 
Write a base clause (a short, simple sentence) then add the requested phrase or clause at the end.
Your base clause + (repeating the verb with –ing added)
Your base clause + (start with a different participle)
Your base clause + (past participle)
Your base clause + (a different past participle)
Your base clause + (repeat a noun from the base clause)
Your base clause + (repeat the noun from the base clause)
Your base clause + (possessive pronoun)
Your base clause + (a different possessive pronoun)
Your base clause + (related details. Start the phrase with ‘a’ or ‘the’ )
Your base clause + (noun phrase, starting with the article ‘the’ or ‘a’)
Your base clause + (simile or metaphor)
 
Example:
The woman closed the door, closing it with a bang (repeating the verb with –ing added)
The woman closed the door, catching her heal on the step (participial)
The woman closed the door, blinded by the dust (past participle)
The woman closed the door, driven by the wind (past participle)
The woman closed the door, a door made of rough-hewn oak (repeating the noun)
The woman closed the door, the door she never dared close before (repeating the noun)
The woman closed the door, its massive hinges creaking eerily (possessive pronoun)
The woman closed the door, her delicate fingers white as she squeezed (possessive pronoun)
The woman closed the door, a car alarm beeping in the background (related details)
The woman closed the door, the doorknob helpless in the vice of her grip (noun phrase, starting with article)
The woman closed the door, a quick-thinking Pandora (simile or metaphor)

Example No. 2:
The man played the guitar, playing it like a madman.
The man played the guitar, strumming the old instrument.
The man played the guitar, blinded by the light.
The man played the guitar, driven by his passion.
The man played the guitar, an old, cheap instrument.
The man played the guitar, an instrument he found in a pawn shop.
The man played the guitar, its metal strings cutting into his fingers.
The man played the guitar, his skilled fingers dancing over the frets.
The man played the guitar, a crowd gathering to listen.
The man played the guitar, the rosewood shining in the sun.
The man played the guitar, a modern-day Segovia.
For all it brightens and uplifts, love casts a long shadow.
 
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Messages In This Thread
Week Ten: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 12-31-2019, 01:22 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 12-31-2019, 01:23 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 12-31-2019, 01:27 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 12-31-2019, 01:38 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 12-31-2019, 01:53 PM
RE: Week One: Sentence Patterns - by Lord Regent - 12-31-2019, 01:55 PM

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